Rosy-striped Knot-horn (Oncocera semirubella) at Sun Rising

Our Little Rare Rosy

Throughout the year, our wonderful moth-ers (as opposed to mothers) come to run surveys at Sun Rising.  During the summer months, that is every month, the last one being at the end of July.  Everyone will be aware that there are far fewer moths than there used to be in this world, so every little whisper of good news that emerges from one of our surveys is well worth shouting out about.

Two moth species were found at Sun Rising that have never before been recorded in our little square of England!  The Pyrausta nigrata has a common name of the wavy-barred sable.  It’s a beautiful little moth, dark chocolate brown with tan flecks and a white wave across the wings, and we suspect it has been drawn to the site by the growing patches of wild marjoram.

Rosy-striped Knot-horn (Oncocera semirubella) at Sun Rising

Rosy-striped Knot-horn (Oncocera semirubella) at Sun Rising

Oncocera semirubella is an even more important find: the rosy-striped knot-horn moth, this is an exquisite pink and gold moth which feeds on birdsfoot trefoil and clovers.  This one is a Notable B species on a national level, which means it is really rather rare throughout the country.  We’re very happy to have it!  The photograph above was taken by one of our fabulous moth-ers, Peter Beasley.  Thank you, Peter!  It’s an exciting find and worth celebrating.

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